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Internal Gangrene (Gangrene) : Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Prevention



Internal Gangrene: Overview

Gangrene is a term that describes dead or dying body tissue(s) that occur because the local blood supply to the tissue is either lost or is inadequate to keep the tissue alive. Gangrene has been recognized as a localized area of tissue death since ancient times. The Greeks used the term gangraina to describe putrefaction (death) of tissue. Although many laypeople associate the term gangrene with a bacterial infection, the medical use of the term includes any cause that compromises the blood supply that results in tissue death. Consequently, a person can be diagnosed with gangrene but does not have to be "infected."
Gangrene affecting one or more of your organs, such as your intestines, gallbladder or appendix, is called internal gangrene. This type of gangrene occurs when blood flow to an internal organ is blocked — for example, when your intestines bulge through a weakened area of muscle in your abdomen (hernia) and become twisted.
Internal gangrene may cause fever and severe pain. Left untreated, internal gangrene can be fatal.
After physical examination, your doctor may order blood tests and imaging tests like CT Scam and MRI to confirm the diagnosis.

issue that has been damaged by gangrene can't be saved, but steps can be taken to prevent gangrene from progressing. These treatments include surgery, antibiotics and Hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

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