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Non Polio Enterovirus Infection : Overview



Non-polio enteroviruses are very common. They cause about 10 to 15 million infections and tens of thousands of hospitalizations each year in the United States. Most people who get infected with these viruses do not get sick or they only have mild illness, like the common cold. But some people can have serious complications, especially infants and people with weakened immune systems.
Most people who are infected with non-polio enteroviruses do not get sick, or they only have mild illness, like the common cold.
Non-polio enteroviruses can be found in an infected person's feces (stool), eyes, nose, and mouth secretions (such as saliva, nasal mucus, or sputum), or blister fluid.
Pregnant women who are infected with a non-polio enterovirus shortly before delivery can pass the virus to their babies.
Mothers who are breastfeeding should talk with their doctor if they are sick or think they may have an infection.
Non-polio enteroviruses can be shed (passed from a person's body into the environment) in your stool for several weeks or longer after you have been infected. The virus can be shed from your respiratory tract for 1 to 3 weeks or less. Infected people can shed the virus even if they don't have symptoms.
Many people who are infected with non-polio enteroviruses do not have symptoms, but can still spread the virus to other people. This makes it is difficult to prevent them from spreading.
You can take few steps which can help to reduce the risk which may include:
  1. Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after using the toilet and changing diapers.
  2. Avoid close contact, such as touching and shaking hands, with people who are sick.
  3. Clean and disinfecting frequently touched surfaces.
There is no specific treatment for non-polio enterovirus infection. People with mild illness caused by non-polio enterovirus infection typically only need symptom treatment. They usually recover completely.

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