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Pseudogout - Definition, Causes, Symptoms


Pseudogout  - Slideshow



What is pseudogout?
Other Names: calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease or CPPD
Pseudogout is a type of inflammation of joints (arthritis) that is caused by deposits of crystals, called calcium pyrophosphate, in and around the joints. It is a form of arthritis characterized by sudden, painful swelling in one or more of your joints. These episodes can last for days or weeks. The most commonly affected joint is the knee.
It isn't clear why crystals form in your joints and cause pseudogout, but the risk increases with age.
Pseudogout has been reported to occasionally coexist with gout. This means that the two types of crystals can sometimes be found in the same joint fluid.

What are the symptoms of pseudogout?
Pseudogout can result in arthritis of a number of joints. The most common joint affected is the knee, but it can also involve the wrists, shoulders, hips, and/or ankles.
In many cases, there are no symptoms. However, during a pseudogout attack, the affected joints are usually:
  • Swollen
  • Warm
  • Severely painful


What are the causes pseudogout?

Pseudogout is primarily caused by the precipitation of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals developing within a joint space. These crystals become more numerous as people age, appearing in nearly half the population older than age 85. But most people who have these crystal deposits never develop pseudogout. It's not clear why some people have symptoms and others don't.

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