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Clostridium Difficile Colitis - Definition, Symptoms



Complications
Prevention
Prognosis

What is Clostridium Difficile Colitis?
Other Names: Pseudomembranous colitis, Clostridium Difficile Colitis, Antibiotic-Associated Colitis, C. difficile Colitis, C. diff
Clostridium difficile, also known as C. difficile or C. diff, is a bacterium that can infect the bowel and cause diarrhoea. The C. difficile bacterium has two forms, an active, infectious form that cannot survive in the environment for prolonged periods, and an inactive, "noninfectious" form, called a spore, that can survive in the environment for prolonged periods.
Antibiotic-associated (C. difficile) colitis is an infection of the colon caused by C. difficile that occurs primarily among individuals who have been using antibiotics.
C. difficile infections are unpleasant and can sometimes cause serious bowel problems, but they can usually be treated with another course of antibiotics.
What are the symptoms of Clostridium Difficile Colitis?
Symptoms of a C. difficile infection usually develop when you're taking antibiotics, or when you've finished taking them within the last few weeks.
igns and symptoms of pseudomembranous colitis may include:
  • Diarrhea that can be watery or even bloody
  • Abdominal cramps, pain or tenderness
  • Fever
  • Pus or mucus in your stool
  • Nausea
  • Dehydration


Symptoms of pseudomembranous colitis can begin as soon as one to two days after you start taking an antibiotic, or as long as several weeks after you finish taking the antibiotic.

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